Environmental DNA (eDNA) Analysis a New Genetic Tool for Monitoring, Managing, and Conserving Fishery Resources and Aquatic Habitat

Thursday, September 12, 2013: 8:00 AM-5:00 PM
Fulton (Statehouse Convention Center)
Inherent in the theme of the 143rd meeting of the AFS, “Preparing for the challenges ahead”, is the incorporation of new technologies to improve conservation and management of fishery resources and aquatic habitat.  In this context, rapid advances in the field of molecular genetics continue to provide new tools for research, management and conservation.  One such genetic tool is environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis.  eDNA refers to DNA that organisms leave behind or shed as they pass through the environment.  This shed DNA can be detected using routine molecular techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify species-specific genes, potentially linking the organism to the environment without actually observing the organism.  eDNA analysis is currently being evaluated and applied for uses such as surveillance and control of aquatic invasive species, identification and monitoring of endangered species, and analysis of biodiversity.  In this symposium we will explore the methodologies and potential uses of eDNA analysis for monitoring, managing and conserving fishery resources and aquatic habitat.
Organizers:
Jeff Olsen , Denise Hawkins , Meredith Bartron and Jon J. Amberg
Moderators:
Jeff Olsen , Meredith Bartron and Jon J. Amberg
Chair:
Denise Hawkins
8:00 AM
Introduction to Edna: Context, Considerations, and Caveats
Jeff Olsen, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Meredith Bartron, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Denise Hawkins, USFWS Abernathy Fish Technology Center; Jon J. Amberg, United States Geological Survey

8:20 AM
Environmental DNA Detection and Quantification: A New Test For Great Lakes Native and High-Risk Invasive Fish Species
Carson Prichard, University of Toledo; Thomas Blomquist, University of Toledo; James C. Willey, University of Toledo; Carol A. Stepien, University of Toledo

8:40 AM
Microbial Source Tracking and Its Potential to Assist Edna Assay for Asian Carp Monitoring
Wen-Tso Liu, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Lin Ye, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Jon J. Amberg, United States Geological Survey; Mark P. Gaikowski, US Geological Survey; Duane Chapman, USGS, Columbia Environmental Research Center

9:20 AM
Comparison Of Particle Capture Methods For Edna Surveillance
Andrew Tucker, The Nature Conservancy; W. Lindsay Chadderton, The Nature Conservancy; Christopher Jerde, University of Notre Dame; Matthew A. Barnes, University of Notre Dame; Brett P. Olds, University of Notre Dame; Mark A. Renshaw, University of Notre Dame; Cameron R. Turner, University of Notre Dame; Karen Uy, University of Notre Dame; Timothy Strakosh, US Fish and Wildlife Service; David M. Lodge, University of Notre Dame

 
Th-FU-6
Using Next-Generation Sequencing of Environmental DNA to Assess Fish Assemblages in Alaskan National Parks (Withdrawn)
10:00 AM
Thursday AM Break


10:20 AM
Evaluation of An Environmental DNA Procedure for the Detection of New Zealand Mudsnails
Randy Oplinger, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources; John Wood, Pisces Molecular; Larry Dalton, Utah Department of Natural Resources; Eric Wagner, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources

10:40 AM
Development of Molecular Markers for Environmental DNA Detection of the Invasive African Jewel Fish (Hemichromis letourneuxi): A New Monitoring Tool for Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge
Edgardo Diaz-Ferguson, Auburn University; Jeffrey Herod, US Fish and Wildlife Service; John Galvez, US Fish and Wildlife Service; Sylvia Pelizza, US Fish and Wildlife Service; Gregory R. Moyer, US Fish and Wildlife Service

11:00 AM
Understanding Vectors and Fomites and Overcoming Their Challenges in Edna Monitoring
Jon J. Amberg, United States Geological Survey; Sunnie NcCalla, USGS Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center; Mark Gaikowski, USGS Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center

11:20 AM
Factors Affecting Detection Probability of Fishes and Amphibians Using Environmental DNA Sampling
Caren Goldberg, University of Idaho; Katherine Strickler, University of Idaho; Alexander Fremier, University of Idaho; Lisette Waits, University of Idaho

11:40 AM
Environmental Conditions Influence eDNA Persistence In Aquatic Systems
Matthew A. Barnes, University of Notre Dame; Cameron R. Turner, University of Notre Dame; Christopher Jerde, University of Notre Dame; Mark A. Renshaw, University of Notre Dame; W. Lindsay Chadderton, The Nature Conservancy; David M. Lodge, University of Notre Dame

12:00 PM
Thursday Lunch


 
Th-FU-14
Does Aqueous Edna Concentration Indicate Fish Density? Intrinsic and Methodological Considerations (Withdrawn)
1:20 PM
Effect of Distance From Source and Stream Flow On Edna Signal Strength in Two Headwater Streams
Stephen Jane, University of Massachusetts Amherst; Taylor Wilcox, U.S. Forest Service; Kevin S. McKelvey, U.S. Forest Service; Michael K. Young, U.S. Forest Service; Michael K. Schwartz, U.S. Forest Service; Winsor Lowe, University of Montana; Andrew R. Whiteley, University of Massachusetts Amherst

1:40 PM
DNA Shedding Rates of Asian Carps, for Use in Understanding Field Collections of Edna
Katy Klymus, USGS Missouri Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit; Cathy Richter, USGS, Columbia Environmental Research Center; Duane Chapman, USGS, Columbia Environmental Research Center; Craig P. Paukert, U.S. Geological Survey Missouri Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

2:00 PM
Sampling Design and Considerations for Environmental DNA Collection in Aquatic Systems
Timothy Strakosh, US Fish and Wildlife Service; John Sweka, USFWS, Northeast Fishery Center; Chris Olds, USFWS, Alpena Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office; Stephen Hensler, USFWS, Alpena Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office; William Chadderton, The Nature Conservancy; Christopher Jerde, University of Notre Dame

2:20 PM
Environmental DNA Detection of Invasive Species in the Great Lakes Commercial Bait Trade
Lucas Nathan, Central Michigan University; Andrew Mahon, Central Michigan University; Michelle Budny, University of Notre Dame; Christopher Jerde, University of Notre Dame

2:40 PM
Tracking Ghosts: Using Environmental DNA Detection to Find Invasive and Endangered Aquatic Species in Ontario
Chris Wilson, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources; Jennifer Bronnenhuber, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources; Kristyne M. Wozney, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources; Scott M. Reid, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources

3:00 PM
Thursday PM Break


3:20 PM
Using Environmental DNA To Detect Aquatic Species: Case Studies of An Invasive Non-Native Char and Cryptic Amphibian
Scott Blankenship, Cramer Fish Sciences; Gregg Schumer, Cramer Fish Sciences; Erica Maltz, Burns Paiute Tribe; Lisa Hallock, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

3:40 PM
Environmental DNA (eDNA) As a Potential Monitoring Tool: A Case Study Using An Endangered Fish (Notropis topeka)
Robert Everhart, Kansas Biological Survey; Belinda Sturm, University of Kansas; Don Huggins, Kansas Biological Survey; Michael Grose, KU Biodiversity Institute; Scott Campbell, Kansas Biological Survey; Debbie Baker, Kansas Biological Survey; Adam Blackwood, Kansas Biological Survey

4:00 PM
Environmental DNA Monitoring for Asian Carp in the Upper Mississippi River
Loren Miller, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources; Jon J. Amberg, United States Geological Survey; Byron Karns, National Park Service; Tim Schlagenhaft, Audubon Minnesota; Peter W. Sorensen, University of Minnesota

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